Dell Seton Medical Center

It’s hard to believe Dell Seton Medical Center at UT (DSMC-UT) is about to celebrate its second-year anniversary! As I reflect on these past two years, I am so incredibly proud and grateful for all that nursing has contributed to the future of care in our growing community.

As we continue to experience programmatic growth and clinical advancements in areas such as neurosciences, burns, surgical oncology, trauma and transplants, nursing remains at the forefront for advancing knowledge and expertise to elevate the standards of care and clinical outcomes. Your deep commitment to providing care is both compassionate and person-centered. I am truly in awe of what DSMC-UT nurses do every day!

With all my gratitude,

Coleen E. Backus, MSN, RN
Chief Nursing Officer

DSMC Quick Facts

*Does not include physicians
Patient Days: 63,390Outpatient Surgical Visits: 4,053
Average Daily Census: 173.67Employees*: 1,664
Average Length of Stay: 5.26Licensed Beds: 195
ER Visits: 70,329Registered Nurses: 690
Outpatient Visits: 108,551BSN or Higher Rate: 72.60%
Inpatient Surgical Visits: 5,197Certification Rate: 31.00%

Stories

Dell Seton Establishes RN/Medical Resident Council

In November 2018, Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas created the first RN/Resident Council as part of its pursuing excellence initiative. The goal of the Council is to improve communications between RNs and medical residents and ultimately improve patient care.

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New Burn Program at Dell Seton Medical Center Expanding and Innovating

Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas at Austin (Dell Seton) opened its burn unit in 2017 when the new teaching hospital first opened its doors to the public. In the past year, the burn program has grown to serve even more patients, while providing the highest level of care in the region.

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Dell Seton Nurses Create Innovative “DashBoard” to Share “Voices of the Patient” Survey Data

Patient comments collected during HCAHPS surveys (“Voices of the Patient”) provide an important source of information for nurse leaders to identify trends and opportunities for improvement in patient care. Nurses at Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas (“Dell Seton”) saw an opportunity to improve the way “Voices of the Patient” data was reported and distributed so that it was easier for leadership to navigate and use.

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