Stories of Impact

Lives are changed daily, even saved, thanks to Seton Healthcare Family’s expert care, expanding medical research, and new models of health care delivery being developed in coordination with Central Health.

Here are just a few of many stories, and you can find more stories and more information about the new teaching hospital on the website for The Seton Fund.

Ken: Surviving a “Widow Maker”

Ken-Jones-family_editedIn good shape overall and committed to a rigorous exercise and self-defense regimen, the last thing 49-year-old Ken Jones expected was a severe heart attack.

After life-saving CPR from one of his Krav Maga classmates and a rush to the UMC Brackenridge emergency room, doctors found that Ken had a serious blood clot in what’s known as the “widow maker” artery. To make matters worse, he could barely breathe due to massive fluid buildup in his lungs.

Thanks to the fast and expert treatment of the heart care team, Ken and his family were celebrating his 50th birthday just two months later, with more reason to feel thankful than ever.


The Mortons: Life after a Frightening Accident

MortonAll four members of the Morton family share something unusual in common: together, they survived a life-threatening car accident. When another vehicle collided with theirs, the Mortons found themselves facing hospitalization, treatment and rehabilitation for injuries ranging from seat belt burns to broken bones and internal organ damage.

The team at Seton provided prompt medical care for the physical injuries, but also made sure to keep each member of the family informed about how the others were doing throughout the treatment process so none of them felt alone. Today, the Mortons enjoy full and active lives, and say the car accident brought them closer together than ever.


Madison: Looking Back with Gratitude

Madison-dog-250-webMadison was a regular 18-year-old girl on her way to grab a milkshake when her car was T-boned just two miles from her house. Critically injured, Madison needed three separate brain surgeries over the next 24 hours while her family watched, waited and prayed by her bedside. Trying to adjust to the dramatic shift from finalizing plans for college to fearing for their daughter’s life left her parents in shock.

The team at Seton stepped in to deliver not only the expert medical care Madison needed to make a full recovery, but the emotional support her family needed to move forward together. “I wish I remembered all the doctors and nurses who cared for me,” says Madison. “But I am thankful for how far I’ve come in a year. That’s all thanks to them.”

This fall, Madison began her first semester as a Texas Tech Red Raider. And she’s already received the honor of Outstanding Freshman from her sorority.


Hunter: Saving a Beloved Son

HunterDavisportrait250x375“Parachute malfunction.” Just the phrase is enough to scare most people, but experiencing it in person is something else entirely. U.S. Air Force pilot Lt. Hunter Davis was practicing routine training when his main chute and cutaway system both failed, leaving him to plummet 3500 feet to the ground in the span of 30 seconds. The only thing that saved him was managing to pull his body parallel to the ground, avoiding direct headfirst impact.

Simply surviving a fall like that is rare enough, but with the help of the trauma team at Seton—and later, the skilled rehabilitation specialists—Hunter returned to active duty just eight months later, and continues thriving today.